Woolly Mammoth Skull

$145,000.00

Woolly Mammoth Collection

1 in stock

SKU: Woolly Mammoth Skull Categories: , Tags: , , , ,

Description

  • Alaskan Woolly Mammoth
  • Pleistocene Age
  • Width:
  • Height:
  • Length:
  • Gold Mine North of Fairbanks Alaska
  • This Adult Mammoth Skull was found in a Gold Mine with a D-9 Bulldozer scraped across the front of the skull and uncovered it.  The lower jaw was not found during the excavation process.  Instead of using a cast specimen, a matching lower jaw from another Mammoth was used.  Without the lower jaw the skull just didn’t look right!  The matching tusks have natural blue, tan, and cream colorsand have a combined weight of over 200 pounds. The front of the skull was repaired where the bulldozer scraped across it.  This specimen comes with the custom-made steel frame as seen in the photos.   This specimen has a custom-made crate for safe and secure shipping.  (The actual shipping cost will be determined based on the location it is being shipped to.)

 

A mammoth is any species of the extinct genus Mammuthus, proboscideans commonly equipped with long, curved tusks and, in northern species, a covering of long hair. They lived from the Pliocene epoch (from around 5 million years ago) into the Holocene at about 4,500 years ago in Africa, Europe, Asia, and North America. They were members of the family Elephantidae, which also contains the two genera of modern elephants and their ancestors. Mammoths stem from an ancestral species called M. africanavus, the African mammoth. These mammoths lived in northern Africa and disappeared about 3 or 4 million years ago. Descendants of these mammoths moved north and eventually covered most of Eurasia. These were M. meridionalis, the ‘southern mammoths’.

Since many remains of each species of mammoth are known from several localities, it is possible to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the genus through morphological studies. Mammoth species can be identified from the number of enamel ridges on their molars; the primitive species had few ridges, and the amount increased gradually as new species evolved and replaced the former ones. At the same time, the crowns of the teeth became longer, and the skulls become higher from top to bottom and shorter from the back to the front over time to accommodate this.

Like their modern relatives, mammoths were quite large. The largest known species reached heights in the region of 4 m (13 ft) at the shoulder and weights of up to 8 tonnes (8.8 short tons), while exceptionally large males may have exceeded 12 tonnes (13 short tons). However, most species of mammoth were only about as large as a modern Asian elephant (which are about 2.5 m to 3 m high at the shoulder, and rarely exceeding 5 tonnes). Both sexes bore tusks. A first, small set appeared at about the age of six months, and these were replaced at about 18 months by the permanent set. Growth of the permanent set was at a rate of about 2.5 to 15.2 cm (1 to 6 in) per year.

Based on studies of their close relatives, the modern elephants, mammoths probably had a gestation period of 22 months, resulting in a single calf being born. Their social structure was probably the same as that of African and Asian elephants, with females living in herds headed by a matriarch, whilst bulls lived solitary lives or formed loose groups after sexual maturity.

Scientists discovered and studied the remains of a mammoth calf, and found that fat greatly influenced its form, and enabled it to store large amounts of nutrients necessary for survival in temperatures as low as −50 °C (−58 °F). The fat also allowed the mammoths to increase their muscle mass, allowing the mammoths to fight against enemies and live longer.

The woolly mammoth (M. primigenius) was the last species of the genus. Most populations of the woolly mammoth in North America and Eurasia, as well as all the Columbian mammoths (M. columbi) in North America, died out around the time of the last glacial retreat, as part of a mass extinction of megafauna in northern Eurasia and the Americas. Until recently, the last woolly mammoths were generally assumed to have vanished from Europe and southern Siberia about 12,000 years ago, but new findings show some were still present there about 10,000 years ago. Slightly later, the woolly mammoths also disappeared from continental northern Siberia. A small population survived on St. Paul Island, Alaska, up until 3750 BC, and the small mammoths of Wrangel Island survived until 1650 BC. Recent research of sediments in Alaska indicates mammoths survived on the American mainland until 10,000 years ago.

A definitive explanation for their extinction has yet to be agreed. The warming trend (Holocene) that occurred 12,000 years ago, accompanied by a glacial retreat and rising sea levels, has been suggested as a contributing factor. Forests replaced open woodlands and grasslands across the continent. The available habitat would have been reduced for some megafaunal species, such as the mammoth. However, such climate changes were nothing new; numerous very similar warming episodes had occurred previously within the ice age of the last several million years without producing comparable megafaunal extinctions, so climate alone is unlikely to have played a decisive role. The spread of advanced human hunters through northern Eurasia and the Americas around the time of the extinctions, however, was a new development, and thus might have contributed significantly.

IMPORTANT!!!

At the present time it is ILLEGAL to sell and ship ANY Mammoth Ivory in ANY form to New Jersey & New York.   Both states ban the sale, trade, barter and purchase of all ivory, including fossil ivory. The legislation also bans the sale of Rhino Horns.  Effective July 1st, 2016 it is also illegal to sell and ship ANY Mammoth Ivory in ANY form to California.   While Indiana9 Fossils fully understands and supports the attempts to protect MODERN elephants by enacting these laws, it is preposterous that they have banned the sale of Mammoth Ivory!  There are rock solid ways to determine modern ivory versus fossil ivory which would allow law enforcement to differentiate between the 2, but it is presumed that they opted to throw the baby out with the bath water to save themselves the trouble of having to look at the ivory to make that determination.  If you do not agree with the bans please contact your local politicians and let your voice be heard.  We will update this information with changes to the present laws or if additional states enact similar laws.

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